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Do you think dinosaurs are reptiles? 

69%
2,919 deviants said Yes
31%
1,310 deviants said No

Devious Comments

:iconairborneterror:
AirborneTerror Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2015
They're actually birds...
or birds are dinosaurs, or reptiles, we are reptiles too in a way.... and a subset of fish.
aaaaah
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:iconiherduleikdragonites:
iherduleikdragonites Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Technically dinosaurs are classified in Reptilia. By extension, birds are as well. (Though from what I've heard there might be a bit of confusion regarding the real classifications of some things in Reptilia, especially with crocodilians being more closely related to birds than lizards.
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:iconfragillimus335:
Fragillimus335 Featured By Owner May 29, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I'm a paleo student, and both birds and dinosaurs fall within reptilia. So they are both "reptiles", although ALL dinosaurs are much more closely related to birds.

In the same vein you could say humans are fish, which is true, we are just highly evolved, divergent fish. :D
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:iconinvisiblecolour:
InvisibleColour Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2013
Oh my god, my whole life is a lie =/
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:iconlascas:
Lascas Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I believe they have recently been classified as an avion/reptile hybrid.
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:iconsouthstar:
southstar Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2013
Theyre both. Theres evidence to both cold-blooded and warm-blooded dinosaurs.
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:iconmunkeyfu:
munkeyfu Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Dinosaurs are classified as their own species. They are dinosaurs. In a general sense (and I mean extremely general) reptiles, birds, and dinosaurs all more or less developed from the same ancestors. They are related, however, they are separate from each other. Just as we are separate from say a spider monkey. At some point in our past we shared a common link, but we are very separate species.
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:iconmunkeyfu:
munkeyfu Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
One think to also keep in mind is that mammals also developed from this same lineage.
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:iconrhystepesh:
RhysTepesh Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2013
If you consider the Darwin's theory of evolution which happens to remain in the realm of theory... besides the huge gaps they have yet to fill in that theory.
Dinosaurs could very well have been reptiles, but at the same time, they could have just been mammals with scaled skin.
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:iconelsakroese:
ElsaKroese Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2013  Professional General Artist
It bugs me when people confuse the meaning of the word theory.

"A scientific theory summarizes a hypothesis or group of hypotheses that have been supported with repeated testing. If enough evidence accumulates to support a hypothesis, it moves to the next step—known as a theory—in the scientific method and becomes accepted as a valid explanation of a phenomenon.

When used in non-scientific context, the word “theory” implies that something is unproven or speculative. As used in science, however, a theory is an explanation or model based on observation, experimentation, and reasoning, especially one that has been tested and confirmed as a general principle helping to explain and predict natural phenomena."

Essential difference ;).

There's no "huge gaps" in the theory of evolution. The theory works (else it wouldn't be an accepted scientific theory), it's elegant and beautiful: [link]
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:iconsupercj:
SuperCJ Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2013
No, they weren't. Reptilia includes Dinosauria, which includes Aves (birds). You are trying to classify them with what you know of modern reptiles, which is like trying to classify what you know about dinosaurs with what you know about birds.
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:iconcloudsgirl7:
CloudsGirl7 Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2013   General Artist
Eh, it's hard to say.... I'd say -- like ~BurninG-HellOnEarth -- that they're in their own class. But so little is known about them...we'll most likely never decide for sure.
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:iconburningg-hellonearth:
BurningG-HellOnEarth Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
I believe they are their own unique class and should not be confined down to either a reptilian nor avian class.
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:iconfergfighter:
fergfighter Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2013
It was recently discovered that what we once thought were a reptilian race are actually Avian (Birds). Most Raptors, T - Rexes, and smaller animals of the like actually had feathers and soft bodies. However the question is a little twisted, as certain other dinosaurs like Triceratops and Stegosaurus are genuine reptiles.
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:iconsupercj:
SuperCJ Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2013
There is no solid proof of your statement of those animals all having feathers. Perhaps when they were juveniles. And you are obviously confused with scientific classification. Reptilia includes Dinosauria, which includes Aves. Thus all dinosaurs are reptiles, and all birds are dinosaurs (and technically a form of reptile).
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:iconmunkeyfu:
munkeyfu Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
While they did develop feathers, many of those same species shed them in maturity and had reptilian like skin. There is a relatively accepted theory that birds evolved out of dinosaurs, however proof is arising that, in fact, birds developed from a distinct class related to dinosaurs but not actually dinosaurs. No dinosaurs are genuine reptiles. They share many reptilian characteristics, however so did mammals of the time. The fact that reptiles evolved separate from and along side dinosaurs is more evidence that dinosaurs are their own distinct species.
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:iconsupercj:
SuperCJ Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2013
Reptiles are not a species. Reptiles (or Reptilia) are a class of animals that includes Dinosauria, which includes Aves (birds). You are thinking of reptiles too narrowly.
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:icondeus-suetonius:
Deus-Suetonius Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
honestly the T-Rex's skeleton looks a LOT like a whale's... or is that just me?
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:iconsupercj:
SuperCJ Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2013
Just you. I cannot see how it looks like a whale's at all.
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:iconpushdug:
Pushdug Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I once saw a documentary about a man who raised a litter of wild turkeys, and they were just like little dinosours, walking around the fields hunting for grasshoppers. It was really easy to imagine that the turkeys were in fact some sort of ornithomimosaurs or other two-legged dinos. On the other hand - turkeys doesn't really look like sauropods...
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:icon123-kitsune:
123-Kitsune Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Regarding some of the flightless species of bird such as the cassowary and the emu, I believe that some types of dinos did evolve into birds.
I think the earliest species of bird was called the Archaeopteryx, whose german name is Urvogel meaning "original bird" or "first bird"
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:iconrainwolfy:
Rainwolfy Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Maybe something different as the others say, they are pretty gigantic and the little ones are ferocious enough.

And weren't birds evolved from feathery dinos? I don't know exactly what that fact means but...


But I think they were more reptilian and I have a book that says so, but it's more than five years old so it probably doesn't match new discoveries today.
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:iconsupercj:
SuperCJ Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2013
All birds are dinosaurs. The class Aves is under Dinosauria.
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:iconthesimmsonian:
thesimmsonian Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Yes. But altogether different from modern reptiles. Sometimes I think it would be more accurate to classify them as something else, though. Something not quite mammal, bird, or reptile; something unique because they were unique lifeforms.
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:iconspelkille:
SpelKille Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2013
Dinosaurs are reptiles due to their evolutionary heritage. Cladistics.
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:iconhypogeum:
Hypogeum Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I am pretty sure modern science defines dinosaurs as reptiles. I've read the arguments presented here and while I agree with most of them, labels are labels. I suppose in that sense, no one is technically wrong ("I believe it should be" vs. "I believe it is").

Hell, we called Pluto a planet for the longest time, even though it was pretty obvious that it was just more of the same from the Kuiper belt.
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:iconponygirl0316:
ponygirl0316 Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
I said yes because technically some are, and some aren't. some were mammals, and some were more closely related to birds than reptiles.
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:iconsupercj:
SuperCJ Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2013
None were mammals. Mammals differentiate from birds and reptiles in having hair, three middle ear bones, mammary glands in females, and a neocortex. By "mammals", you probably are referring to the theory that some or all dinosaurs were warm-blooded.
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:iconponygirl0316:
ponygirl0316 Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
no, i was reffering to the ones that came toward the end of the dinosaur age, i suppose they're not considered dinosaurs. i guess i just think of them that way because they lived around the same time as the dinosaurs.
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:iconsupercj:
SuperCJ Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2013
Which "ones" are you referring to?
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:iconponygirl0316:
ponygirl0316 Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
the mammals that lived alongside the dinosaurs, they came, as i said toward the end of the dinosaurs. like the Eomaia: [link] or the Fruitafossor [link]. and as i said, they technically weren't dinosaurs, they were the first mammals.
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:iconsupercj:
SuperCJ Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2013
There is no need to say "technically dinosaurs". They were entirely separate (sorry if it seems like I'm wasting my time, but some people vaguely refer to any pre-paleogene animal as a dinosaur). Also, dinosaurs and mammals evolved at about the same time. The obvious group just became dominant until the K-Pg extinction.
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:iconponygirl0316:
ponygirl0316 Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
ok.
and yea i know that.
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:iconsupercj:
SuperCJ Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2013
Your previous comments do not show it then. You said something about dinosaurs being mammals and some being birds, which is total garbage.
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(1 Reply)
:icontimbertaliaitaly:
TimbertaliaItaly Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2013  Hobbyist
DIONSAURS ARE ANIMALS.
done :D
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:iconsupercj:
SuperCJ Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2013
:iconipoopedplz:
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:iconsupercj:
SuperCJ Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2013
You don't say?:ipoopedplz:
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:iconvampire-genocide:
vampire-genocide Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2013
There's conflicting opinions regarding just how dinosaurs fit into everything. Dinosaurs are not birds, but birds are dinosaurs. Dinosaurs are very closely related to reptiles, more so than birds, but are not 'technically' reptiles. The term 'reptile' itself has come to have a very flexible meaning. However, some are putting forward the theory that both dinosaurs and birds are technically in the reptile group.
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:iconsupercj:
SuperCJ Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2013
Scientifically speaking, all dinosaurs (and by extension birds) are a form of Reptilia. It's their classification, not a theory. Too many people think too narrowly, almost entirely because of the confusion brought up by common names, like "birds" instead of "Aves".
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:iconmarrinwolf:
MarrinWolf Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2013
Yes dinosaurs are classified under Reptilia by their evolution so they are reptiles. It has now been realized that birds did evolve from them at some point which technically means birds are a form of reptile. The Reptilia Class incoproates many different types of creatures. After the Reptilia class there are several orders that then contain several several families.

Some of the orders in Reptilia are Crocodilia, Testudines (ex: turtles), Sphenodontia (lizards that are considered ancient fossils), Squamata (snakes, lizards, and worm lizards), and Sauropsida. the last one includes dinosaurs and as you move down the line birds as well. At least this is how current taxonomy has them placed. Taxonomy is changing all the time as new information like DNA is revealed although since such information is what got birds moved under Reptilia in the first place I don't see them being moved back out any time soon.

I'm a bio major so I need to know this kind of stuff and keep up to date with it. Of course what each individual thinks is up to them. After all the scientific community is just another opinion. Admittedly an opinion I like to follow normally but not everyone does.
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:iconvalentinesqueen:
ValentinesQueen Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well when I was little I knew lizard feet and birdy feet could look scaley and similar sometimes.
Honestly, I don't think they can be associated with a modern species's class so easily.
I'd rather say it was evolution at it's most epic! (or maybe something in between)
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:iconbobbinasu:
BobbinaSu Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Yes. Most people say dinosaurs are birds, not reptiles. First, it's not that dinosaurs are birds, birds are dinosaurs. Literally, they're classified as a type of theropod dinosaur. Second, dinosaurs are reptiles. While they are a strange behaving group, dinosaurs are so diverse, it's hard to judge. Some are more caring to young, some are reptile-hipped, some are herbivores, others carnivores, some omnivores. Overall, dinosaurs ARE scientifically classified into reptiles. Of course, classification boundaries are always fuzzy. But, from what we know right now, yes they are reptiles. And birds are dinosaurs, so birds ARE reptiles. Just strange ones. But then again, when has any class been generic?
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:iconmunchlaxboy:
MunchlaxBoy Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2013
They were reptiles, but the earth's condition selected only the ones who were closer to birds to survive, so these survivors evolved into today's birds...
So I think there were dinosaurs who can be considered reptiles, and ones who can be birds
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:iconsupercj:
SuperCJ Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2013
All birds are dinosaurs (the class Aves is under Dinosauria), and Dinosauria is under the group Sauropsida, so all birds are technically reptiles.
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:icondarazan:
darazan Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
That's pretty difficult to define since the word "dinosaur" spans many species and eras, and had many different characteristics. Modern science sees dinosaurs as being more bird-like, although before they were more seen like reptiles. So the definition has changed over time as new evidence gives rise to new theories. Personally, I agree with the opinion that birds are dinosaurs. It's not only a way more fun way to look at birds, but a much more interesting way to look at dinosaurs and may give us more insight into the way they lived.
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:iconsupercj:
SuperCJ Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2013
Birds are literally dinosaurs. The class Aves is listed under Dinosauria, so there isn't really any argument there.
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:icondarazan:
darazan Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
All I was saying was that the definition and view of "dinosaurs" has changed over time (and will likely change even more as time continues on). Birds were not always classified as dinosaurs, though they are now. There are still those in the scientific and paleontology communities who don't agree with this viewpoint (you can never convince everyone), though I do agree with the majority view that birds are dinosaurs, as I stated. It'll be interesting to see what new discoveries are made and how the view changes over time, though.
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:iconsupercj:
SuperCJ Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2013
It would take some huge discoveries to move the birds out of the dinosaur grouping, but anything is possible. It'll be fun when some huge paleontology discovery is made, though.
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:icondarazan:
darazan Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Definitely. I'm always excited when I find that they're doing something new in paleontology. (Though I seem to always find out a few years afterwards...odd.)
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:iconkuromeru-kitsune:
kuromeru-kitsune Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2013
I'll take my feathery raptors and sit in the 'bird' corner.
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